Share this page | Email | Contact Us

Special Report on

Using Persuasion in Advertising

using persuasion in advertising special research report Photo by www.digital-tv.co.uk
Some of the biggest advertisers are taking their advertising away from full page ads and television spots and spending up on hidden persuasion. You won't find these secret messages in ice-cubes or flickering film footage like they were in the sixties. Subliminal advertising has gone mainstream - fake news, mind control scripts, propaganda and stealth voicemail are in wide use by corporations, government bodies, and industry groups. Have you spotted any of these? 1. Point of Sale Mind Control Scripts Clothing store staff and car salesmen use them to close the deal - carefully planned questions and subverbal cues to get you ...
an audience (viewers, readers or listeners) to purchase or take some action upon products, ideals, or services. It includes the name of a product or service and how that product or service could benefit the consumer, to persuade a target market to purchase or to consume that particular brand . These brands are usually paid for or identified through sponsors and viewed via various media. Advertising can also serve to communicate an idea to a mass amount of people in an attempt to convince them to take a certain action, such as encouraging 'environmentally friendly' behaviors, and even unhealthy behaviors through food ...
REVIEWS AND OPINIONS
Books Reviews The Jungle
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. Customer Reviews Destined to Fail? 3 / 5.0 Excited about using my new Kindle DX, I downloaded an old book that I was assigned to read when I was a freshman in college, years ago: The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. It's a very interesting book. It has a very Socialist viewpoint. In fact, Upton Sinclair, who was quite a socialist, wrote the book as an expose of capitalism, an endorsement of unions, and a call to workers to unite. It ... market research, surveys and trends
Who's Afraid of Subliminal Advertising? - Reason Magazine
The concept of subliminal advertising has long terrified America. When the 1950s adman James Vicary claimed to have boosted concession sales at a New Jersey theater by briefly flashing phrases like “drink Coca-Cola” on the screen as the main feature played, pundits and politicians worried that we were now just one double feature away from turning into brainwashed, popcorn-gobbling Stalinists. In the 1970s, the Canadian academic Wilson Bryan Key convinced millions that magazine ads for booze, cigarettes, and even Ritz Crackers featured more sexual debauchery than a busy night at Plato’s Retreat, inducing feelings of panic and ... market research, surveys and trends

SURVEY RESULTS FOR
USING PERSUASION IN ADVERTISING

Persuasion - AEF
Advertising is about selling. By nature, advertising is neither neutral nor objective. Pleading its case through the strongest, most persuasive means, advertising informs, entertains and sells. Occasionally, it even inspires. If advertising is about selling, then persuasion is how we get there. BACKGROUND Consumers are not persuaded by illogical or irrational promises and can see through ill-conceived ideas. You might be surprised to learn that 80 to 90 percent of new products launched FAIL. Smart marketers hold the utmost respect for their ... industry trends, business articles and survey research
10 Disturbing Trends in Subliminal Advertising
Subliminal advertising has gone mainstream - fake news, mind control scripts, propaganda and stealth voicemail are in wide use by corporations, government bodies and industry groups. By Martin Howard Author of We Know What You Want: How They Change Your Mind Some of the biggest advertisers are taking their advertising away from full page ads and television spots and spending up on hidden persuasion. You won't find these secret messages in ice-cubes or flickering film footage like they were in the sixties. Subliminal advertising has gone ... industry trends, business articles and survey research
RELATED NEWS
Neuroscientists can predict your behavior better than you can
In a study with implications for the advertising industry and public health organizations, UCLA neuroscientists have shown they can use brain scanning to predict whether people will use sunscreen during a one-week period even better than the people themselves can. "There is a very long history within psychology of people not being very good judges of what they will actually do in a future situation," said the study's senior author, Matthew Lieberman, a UCLA professor of psychology and of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences. "Many people 'decide' to do things but then don't do them." The ... market trends, news research and surveys resources
Selling Paradise to the People
Want to get away? No problem. Take a plane, train, bus or car to some distant place and you’ll find the serenity that eludes you in daily life. Or so the tourist industry would have you believe. A 1922 work by Edward McKnight Kauffer offers a rare hint of Social Realism among this show of London Transport posters. Once the province of the wealthy and the uncommonly adventurous, escapist travel became available to the masses in the 20th century, as increasingly efficient modes of transportation and greater amounts of leisure time made the vacation seem an inalienable human right. This in turn spawned a tremendous culture of ... market trends, news research and surveys resources

INFORMATION RESOURCES

Emotional Persuasion in Advertising: A Hierarchy-of-Processing ...
with persuasion. However, persuasion is capable of being defined in more than one ..... categories using advertising, citing instant coffee and ice cream as ... technology research, surveys study and trend statistics
Tobacco advertising and the art and science of persuasion
which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. There has been a great deal of tobacco control literature over the past decade regarding how advertising is used to persuade consumers to purchase tobacco, and ultimately to become loyal brand smokers. In a similar manner the literature increasingly describes methods to "counter advertise;" i.e., to use advertising in an attempt to persuade individuals to quit smoking, or better yet, to not initiate smoking. The article by DiFranza and Pollay in this issue of journal raises an intriguing question: ... technology research, surveys study and trend statistics
Topics in Social Psychology: Persuasion (CROW)
a collection of WWII propaganda from the National Library of Scotland -- it makes a distinction between and presents examples of "black propaganda" (intended to demoralize the enemy) and "white propaganda" (intended to inform and boost morale of the homefront). [added 12/26/06] "Propaganda tactics and Fahrenheit 9/11" - essay by Kelton Rhoads on his "Working Psychology" site -- He also wrote a follow-up essay entitled "Backdraft 9/11: A backlash against Michael Moore on election day?" [added 6/20/05] "To protect ...
REAL TIME
USING PERSUASION IN ADVERTISING
latest webinars
  1. Tv Effectiveness Webcast Rubinson
  2. eMarketer Webinar: Keys to Online Display Advertising
Join these Webinars to learn more about current research, trends and surveys.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
WikiAnswers - What is an example of propaganda in advertising
Propaganda is different than persuasion. A propagandist is only interested in achieving his goals. Persuasion involves a dialogue between two parties. If I'm attempting to persuade you, I make my goals clear, state my case, listen to your concerns, adjust my goals as necessary, etc. Ideally, both sides win. That's not the case with propaganda, which is one-sided with the goals of the propagandist concealed. A propagandist attempts to achieve his goals at all costs. First answer by Themarketingarm . Last edit by Themarketingarm . Contributor trust : 67 [ recommend contributor ]. Question
Using Emotion for Persuasion
The other day, I received the last issue of a business magazine before my subscription runs out. Now, I like this magazine, but I'm swamped with reading matter so I won't renew. Of course, I've received many reminders and offers about renewing; magazines try very hard to keep the subscribers they've got. So when the last issue came with a special promotional wrapper on the cover, I wasn't surprised. But, what made this one interesting was a clever piece of copy that hit an emotional chord: inside the back cover of the special wrapper were the words, ...